Your June Colorado Insect Checklist

//Your June Colorado Insect Checklist

Your June Colorado Insect Checklist

June Colorado Insect checklist of some common insect-related events – Denver metro and Boulder, Denver South and East, and West Metro

 This is a generalized checklist of when some of the more important insect related events tend to occur in our area. Year to year variations are considerable – this should be used as a guideline to anticipate and help recognize common insect occurrences.

 

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May Colorado Insect Checklist - ArborScape Colorado Tree Service, tree trimming, tree removal, stump removal

 

DENVER METRO & BOULDER

Early June

Aphids: small insects ranging in color: orange, red, green, gray, brown -feed on plant fluids. Can be controlled several ways – see CSU Extension fact sheet here.

Flea beetles: Several species attack garden plants. Seedlings may need protection.

Grasshoppers: Egg hatch may begin for many species.

Late June

Potato/tomato psyllid: Flights of migrating psyllids arrive in state and start to colonize garden plants.

Grasshoppers: Egg lay largely completed. Optimum time for treatment.

Colorado potato beetle: Peak period of egg laying on potato and eggplant.

Flea beetles: Populations usually have peaked during this period.

Twospotted spider mite: Populations start to increase on a wide variety of garden plants.

Squash Bugs: Hatch from overwintering in winter debris


 May Colorado Insect Checklist - ArborScape Colorado Tree Service, tree trimming, tree removal, stump removal

DENVER SOUTH AND EAST

Early June

Household Insects

Miller moths: Moths move to mountains with warm weather.

Honeybee swarms: Many honeybee colonies produce swarms during sunny days

Tree/Shrub Insects

Brownheaded ash sawfly: Infestations should be declining rapidly, end for season.

Pine needle scale: Crawler emergence usually is continuing and declining during this period.

Oystershell scale: Continue to monitor emergence of crawlers. Peak crawler period often occurs in early June.

Honeysuckle witches’ broom aphid: Damage to new growth begins to become evident.

Douglas-fir tussock moth: Egg hatch may begin. Monitor infested trees.

Eriophyid mites: Gall making occurs on many plants. Highest populations of leaf vagrants present.

Spruce spider mite: Populations rapidly increase on spruce, juniper

Douglas-fir tussock moth: Intensify monitoring of infested sites as feeding damage increases.

Honeylocust plant bugs: Peak injury by nymphs and adults present. Damage will end soon.

Fruittree leafrollers: Peak populations of larvae are generally present.

Elm leaf beetle: Egg laying and egg hatch often peaks at this time.

Cottonwood leaf beetle: Egg laying begins on cottonwood.

Bronzed cane borer/rose stem girdler: Peak period of egg laying in caneberries, currant, rose.

Honeylocust borer, bronzed birch borer, oak borers: Adults often emerge by mid-June. Beetles feed on leaves and then lay eggs on bark.

Juniper spittlebug: Spittle masses become obvious as nymphs become fully grown.

Mountain pine beetle: This is a good period to begin making preventive applications

Western spruce budworm: During outbreaks in forested areas this is often optimal time to treat

Lawns Spider mites: Populations should be decreasing rapidly with warm weather.

Garden Insects

Flea beetles: Several species attack garden plants. Seedlings may need protection.

Grasshoppers: Egg hatch may begin for many species

Late June

Household Insects

Strawberry root weevil: Adults begin to move into homes.

Miller moths: Miller moth activity should slow as most have moved to mountains and favored flowering plants become less available.

Ant swarms: Winged ants are forced out of colonies during warm afternoons following rainfall events

Tree/Shrub Insects

Cottony maple scale: Females swell and produce conspicuous egg sacks.

Spruce spider mite: Typical period of peak populations.

Douglas-fir tussock moth: Egg hatch often is peaking during this period. Monitor infested trees.

Rose leafhoppers: Peak injury to foliage of rose.

Poplar borer: Adults often begin to emerge from aspen in late June.

Peach tree borer: Adult emergence typically begins. Monitor flights with pheromone traps.

Cooley spruce gall adelgid: First emergence from spruce galls and migration.

Honeylocust spider mite: Populations begin to build towards their midsummer peak.

Elm leaf beetle: Injury by generation one beetles become evident.

Mountain pine beetle: Optimal treatment time for most areas.

Pinyon pitch mass borer: Adult emergence begins.

Root weevils: Leaf notching injuries produced by adult weevils start to be noticeable

Garden Insects

Potato/tomato psyllid: Flights of migrating psyllids arrive in state and start to colonize garden plants.

Grasshoppers: Egg egg largely completed. Optimum time for treatment.

Colorado potato beetle: Peak period of egg laying on potato and eggplant.

Flea beetles: Populations usually have peaked during this period.

Twospotted spider mite: Populations start to increase on a wide variety of garden plants.


JEFFCO AND PARK COUNTIES

Early June

Household Insects

Miller moths: Moths move to mountains with warm weather.

Honeybee swarms: Many honeybee colonies produce swarms during sunny days

Tree/Shrub Insects

Brownheaded ash sawfly: Infestations should be declining rapidly, end for season.

Pine needle scale: Crawler emergence usually is continuing and declining during this period.

Oystershell scale: Continue to monitor emergence of crawlers. Peak crawler period often occurs in early June.

Honeysuckle witches’ broom aphid: Damage to new growth begins to become evident.

Douglas-fir tussock moth: Egg hatch may begin. Monitor infested trees.

Eriophyid mites: Gall making occurs on many plants. Highest populations of leaf vagrants present.

Spruce spider mite: Populations rapidly increase on spruce, juniper

Douglas-fir tussock moth: Intensify monitoring of infested sites as feeding damage increases.

Honeylocust plant bugs: Peak injury by nymphs and adults present. Damage will end soon.

Fruittree leafrollers: Peak populations of larvae are generally present.

Elm leaf beetle: Egg laying and egg hatch often peaks at this time.

Cottonwood leaf beetle: Egg laying begins on cottonwood.

Bronzed cane borer/rose stem girdler: Peak period of egg laying in caneberries, currant, rose.

Honeylocust borer, bronzed birch borer, oak borers: Adults often emerge by mid-June. Beetles feed on leaves and then lay eggs on bark.

Juniper spittlebug: Spittle masses become obvious as nymphs become fully grown.

Mountain pine beetle: This is a good period to begin making preventive applications

Western spruce budworm: During outbreaks in forested areas this is often optimal time to treat
Lawns

Spider mites: Populations should be decreasing rapidly with warm weather.
Garden Insects

Flea beetles: Several species attack garden plants. Seedlings may need protection.

Grasshoppers: Egg hatch may begin for many species

 

Late June

Household Insects

Strawberry root weevil: Adults begin to move into homes.

Miller moths: Miller moth activity should slow as most have moved to mountains and favored flowering plants become less available.

Ant swarms: Winged ants are forced out of colonies during warm afternoons following rainfall events

Duff millipedes: Duff millipedes tend to move into homes during warm, dry periods

Strawberry root weevil: Strawberry root weevils tend to move into homes during warm, dry periods

Tree/Shrub Insects

Cottony maple scale: Females swell and produce conspicuous egg sacks.

Spruce spider mite: Typical period of peak populations.

Douglas-fir tussock moth: Egg hatch often is peaking during this period. Monitor infested trees.

Rose leafhoppers: Peak injury to foliage of rose.

Poplar borer: Adults often begin to emerge from aspen in late June.

Peach tree borer: Adult emergence typically begins. Monitor flights with pheromone traps.

Cooley spruce gall adelgid: First emergence from spruce galls and migration.

Honeylocust spider mite: Populations begin to build towards their midsummer peak.

Elm leaf beetle: Injury by generation one beetles become evident.

Mountain pine beetle: Optimal treatment time for most areas.

Pinyon pitch mass borer: Adult emergence begins.

Root weevils: Leaf notching injuries produced by adult weevils start to be noticeable
Garden Insects

Potato/tomato psyllid: Flights of migrating psyllids arrive in state and start to colonize garden plants.

Grasshoppers: Egg egg largely completed. Optimum time for treatment.

Colorado potato beetle: Peak period of egg laying on potato and eggplant.

Flea beetles: Populations usually have peaked during this period.

Twospotted spider mite: Populations start to increase on a wide variety of garden plants.

 

Need help with your landscape health?
Call us at 303-806-TREE or click here to schedule your free plant health care
consultation now!

 

2019-07-30T15:05:22-06:00