Your March Colorado Insect Checklist

//Your March Colorado Insect Checklist

Your March Colorado Insect Checklist

March Colorado Insect checklist of some common insect-related events – Denver metro and Boulder, Denver South and East

 This is a generalized checklist of when some of the more important insect related events tend to occur in our area. Year to year variations are considerable – this should be used as a guideline to anticipate and help recognize common insect occurrences.

 

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DENVER METRO & BOULDER

Early March

Household Insects

Boxelder bugs, cluster flies: Overwintered adults become active in and around homes.
Clover mites: Migrations of mites from lawns into buildings may begin at this time, during warm days
Winged termites: Winged reproductive stages continue to swarm in late winter.
Firewood insects: Bark beetles and wood borers emerge from stored wood in homes.
Ants: Foraging by field ants for sweet materials intensifies in homes.

Trees/Shrubs

Poplar twiggall fly: Larvae begin to leave galls and pupate in soil at the base of trees.
Oystershell scale: Scrape scales with eggs off limbs of aspen, ash and other host plants.
Ips beetles: Ips (engraver) beetles may be active during warm periods. Spruce and pines in high risk sites may need protection.

Lawns

Clover mites: Mites are actively feeding on lawns near buildings and shrubs during warm days.
Nightcrawlers: Tunneling activities during spring can create lumpy lawns.
Vole injury: Tunneling injuries in lawns and girdling of shrubs may be evident as snow melts.

Late March

Household/Miscellaneous

Flickers: Males are actively drumming on buildings and defending territories during mating season.
Ants, clover mites: Movements indoors continue.

Trees/Shrubs

Poplar twiggall fly: Larvae continue to leave galls and pupate in soil at the base of trees.
Dormant oils: Many insects that winter on plants can be controlled with dormant applications of
horticultural oils.
Pinyon needle scale: Females produce cottony egg sacks on branches and trunk.
Ips beetles: Ips (engraver) beetles may be active during warm periods. Spruce and pines in high risk sites may need protection.
Southwestern pine tip moth: Adults begin to emerge from pupae at the base of trees.
Spider mites on juniper: Spring populations may begin to increase; monitor plants.


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DENVER SOUTH AND EAST

Early March

Household Insects

Boxelder bugs, conifer seed bugs, cluster flies: Overwintered adults become active in and around homes.
Clover mites: Migrations of mites from lawns into buildings may begin at this time, during warm days
Firewood insects: Bark beetles and wood borers emerge from stored wood in homes.
Subterranean termites: Winged adults of the aridland subterranean termite fly in late winter.

Trees/Shrubs

Oystershell scale: Scrape scales with eggs off limbs of aspen, ash and other host plants.

Late March

Household/Miscellaneous

Flickers: Males are actively drumming on buildings and defending territories during mating season.
Swallow Bugs: Overwintered swallow bugs become active in anticipate of returning migrant birds and bite humans.
Millipedes: Nuisance movements into homes occurs following wet weather.
Ants: Field ants forage in homes for sweet materials.
Carpet beetles: Some species of carpet beetles are noticeable in spring when they transform to adults.

Trees/Shrubs

Poplar twiggall fly: Larvae begin to leave galls and pupate in soil at the base of trees.
Dormant oils: Many insects that winter on plants can be controlled with dormant applications of horticultural oils.
Ips beetles: Ips (engraver) beetles may be active during warm periods. Recently transplanted pines may need protection.
Southwestern pine tip moth: Adults begin to emerge from pupae at the base of trees.
Spider mites on conifers: Spring activity of spider mites on junipers, pines, arborvitae and spruce increase during spring.

Lawns

Clover mites: Mites are actively feeding on lawns near buildings and shrubs during warm days.
Nightcrawlers: Tunneling activities during spring can create lumpy lawns.
Vole injury: Tunneling injuries in lawns and girdling of shrubs may be evident as snow melts.

Need help with lawn or tree pest management? 
Call us at 303-806-TREE
or click here to schedule your free plant health care consultation now.

 

2019-07-30T15:06:58-06:00