ArborScape announces online EAB cost calculator

//ArborScape announces online EAB cost calculator

ArborScape announces online EAB cost calculator

In an effort to promote awareness of the latest threat to our urban and wild forests, ArborScape has developed an Emerald Ash Borer cost calculator. This web-based application provides ash tree owners and caretakers a local, simple-to-use tool to help manage their ash trees into the future.

EABcalcscreenshot

 

Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check, making it an invasive species. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible).

EAB is highly destructive and responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest. If you own an ash tree and live in Colorado, this species threatens your tree. Don’t move firewood, and consider chemical treatments to protect high-value ash trees. Treatments can effectively protect at-risk trees, but are not recommended by the Colorado Department of Agriculture for property owners more than 5 miles from a known infestation.

 

 

ArborScape can help protect your landscape ash trees without removing them. And it’s important to prevent ash borer before it gets in the tree, as well. The earlier you make a plan, the better the chances of an arborist being able to protect your ash.

 

If your tree has emerald ash borer symptoms, we offer a free evaluation of possible treatment options. Click here for our EAB f.a.q., and call (303) 806-8733 or click here to request a consultation on your ash tree today.

Try the EAB Cost Calculator web application here, and stay tuned for news about our iPhone and Android mobile apps, coming soon to an app store near you.

 

 


 

 

2019-12-19T13:47:58-07:00

About the Author:

I have over ten years experience studying the urban forest and developing easy to understand information for tree care owners. A graduate of the University of Iowa, I've lived in Colorado for 20 years. Since beginning my career as an arborist I've contributed to over 300 articles on tree care and cultural topics with a specialty in dry climates.